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Miscellaneous Flag Decals

Af•ri•can-A•mer•i•can Pronunciation: (af'ri-k u n- u -mer'i-k u n),[key] — n. a black American of African descent. — adj....

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Alien Decal
  $1.95

al•ien Pronunciation: (āl'y u n, ā'lē- u n),[key] — n. 1. a resident born in or belonging to another country who has not acquired...

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Checker Flag
  $1.95

check'ered flag' (in automobile racing) 1. a flag having a pattern of black and white squares, used to signal that a car has crossed the...

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Christian Flag
  $1.95

Christian [ch = k]. The hero of John Bunyan's allegory called The Pilgrim's Progress. He flees from the “City of Destruction,” and journeys to the...

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Culpeper Minutemen Culpeper Minutemen Flag Active...

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Earth Decal
  $1.95

Flag of the Earth The Authentic Earth Flag (a.k.a. Earth Day Flag), the latest proposal of...

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Emergency medical technician

The Star of Life, a global symbol of emergency medical service

EMTs loading an injured skier into an ambulance

Emergency medical technician (EMT) or ambulance technician are terms used in some countries to denote a health care provider of emergency medical services.[1] EMTs are clinicians, trained to respond quickly to emergency situations regarding medical issues, traumatic injuries and accident scenes.

EMTs are most commonly found working in ambulances, but should not be confused with "ambulance drivers" – ambulance staff who in the past were not trained in emergency care or driving. EMTs are often employed by ambulance services, governments, and hospitals, but are also sometimes employed by fire departments (and seen on fire apparatus), in police departments (and seen on police vehicles), and there are many firefighter/EMTs and police officer/EMTs.[1] EMTs operate under a limited scope of practice. EMTs are typically supervised by a medical director, who is a physician.[2][3]

Some EMTs are paid employees, while others (particularly in rural areas) are volunteers.[1]

History

EMT program in the United States began as part of the "Alexandria Plan" in the early 70's, in addition to a growing issue with injuries associated with car accidents. Emergency medicine (EM) as a medical specialty is relatively young. Prior to the 1960s and 70s, hospital emergency departments were generally staffed by physicians on staff at the hospital on a rotating basis, among them general surgeons, internists, psychiatrists, and dermatologists. Physicians in training (interns and residents), foreign medical graduates and sometimes nurses also staffed the Emergency Department (ED). EM was born as a specialty in order to fill the time commitment required by physicians on staff to work in the increasingly chaotic emergency departments (EDs) of the time. During this period, groups of physicians began to emerge who had left their respective practices in order to devote their work completely to the ED. The first of such groups was headed by Dr. James DeWitt Mills who, along with four associate physicians; Dr. Chalmers A. Loughridge, Dr. William Weaver, Dr. John McDade, and Dr. Steven Bednar at Alexandria Hospital, VA established 24/7 year round emergency care which became known as the "Alexandria Plan". It was not until the establishment of American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), the recognition of emergency medicine training programs by the AMA and the AOA, and in 1979 a historical vote by the American Board of Medical Specialties that EM became a recognized medical specialty. The nations first EMT's were from the Alexandria plan working as Emergency Care Technicians serving in the Alexandria Hospital Emergency Room. The training for these technicians was modeled after the established "Physician Assistant" training program and later restructured to meet the basic needs for emergency pre-hospital care. On June 24, 2011, The Alexandria Hospital Celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the Alexandria Plan. In attendance were three of the nations first ECTs/EMTs: David Stover, Larry Jackson, and Kenneth Weaver.

Certification

In the United States, EMTs are certified according to their level of training. Individual states set their own standards of certification (or licensure, in some cases) and all EMT training must meet the minimum requirements as set by theNational Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) standards for curriculum.[4] The National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) is a private organization[5] which offers certification exams based on NHTSA education guidelines.[6] Currently, NREMT exams are used by 46 states as the sole basis for certification at one or more EMT certification levels.[7] A NREMT exam consists of skills and patient assessments as well as a written portion.

The Veteran Emergency Medical Technician Support Act of 2013, H.R. 235 in the 113th United States Congress, would amend the Public Health Service Act to direct the Secretary of Health and Human Services to establish ademonstration program for states with a shortage of emergency medical technicians to streamline state requirements and procedures to assist veterans who completed military EMT training while serving in the Armed Forces to meet state EMT certification and licensure requirements. The bill passed in the United States House of Representatives, but has not yet been voted on in the United States Senate.[8]

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Gadsden flag The Gadsden flag is a historical American flag with a yellow field...

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Come and take it Detail of a mural in the museum at Gonzales, Texas featuring the Come and...

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Jolly Roger The traditional "Jolly Roger" of piracy...

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